Thursday, 4 April 2013

Sushi with sticky walnuts and edamame

This is a recipe for jaded sushi lovers.  You know who you are.  At lunchtime you wander the foodhalls looking at the same old vegetatrian sushi options.  Vegetables or avocado.  You want inspiration!  You want flavour!  So here it is in the form of an amazing sticky walnuts and edamame stuffing. 

This walnut and edamame filling is so good that I am still having sweet dreams about it days after I ate it.  In fact you don't even need the sushi wrapping.  It is good enough to just eat straight from the bowl.  It is probably no small coincidence that it contains two of my favourite seasonings, maple syrup and tamari.  The only warning I will give is that it is very filling.

I first made this sushi a few weeks back for lunch on a lazy weekend.  We planned to make sushi again for lunch yesterday on the way back from the pool but the pull of the library was too strong.  Instead it was cheese pita and dosa masala in the mall before a leisurely visit to the library.  No matter.  The pull of sushi was strong also.  We made it for dinner.

As I mentioned recently, we have been making sushi at home rather a lot.  Our local shopping strip offers far more falafels and pita bread than sushi.  I love sushi but it often seems lacking in protein.  Hence my trawling the interwebs for ideas.  I love how this packs the sushi with protein.  It does however also add more oil, sweetner and salt than usual.  More flavour too. 

Sylvia was not so sure about the edamame and walnut concoction.  So the first time I made it she just had edamame in her sushi.  I still seasoned the sushi rice because Sylvia was eating some of it but I am sure there would be enough flavour without it.  The walnuts taste like sweeties, with a dash of salt and some extra crunch from the sesame seeds.  Oh yes!  The second time Sylvia discovered just how good the candied walnuts were but still did not understand that the edamame cut through the intensity.  Maybe the next time she will get it.  Because there will be a next time.  I can't wait.

I am sending these sushi to Amy's Slightly Indulgent Tuesdays.

Previously on Green Gourmet Giraffe:
One year ago: Spinach crackers and hummus for a potluck
Two years ago:  WHB: Plum and Cinnamon Oat Slice
Three years ago: Eating by colours – orange burgers
Four years ago: Marvellous Mars Bar Slice
Five years ago: Exploring Quinoa Country

Sushi with sticky walnuts and edamame
Adapted from Food and Wine
serves 1 very hungry adult or 2 less hungry adults

1/2 cup sushi rice*
1 cup water*
sushi seasoning, to taste*
1 1/2 tsp black sesame seeds (or white are fine)
1-2 tsp canola oil
1/2 cup walnuts, roughly chopped
1/3 cup edamame beans
1 tbsp maple syrup
2 tsp tamari
2 sheets of nori

Cook sushi rice by placing in a small saucepan with one and a half times the amount of water.  Place a lid on, bring to the boil and then simmer (covered) for 20 minutes over a very low flame.  When cooked, stir in some sushi seasoning if using.

(*NOTE: I usually cook 1 cup of sushi rice in 1 1/2 cups of water because we always use leftovers.  [update 2014: I have changed the quantities for 1/2 cup because I find I need 1 cup water not 3/4 water.]  I was using about 3-4 tbsp rice wine vinegar, 1 tbsp sugar and 3/4 tsp of salt as I did here.  Then I couldn't find rice wine vinegar and had to buy sushi seasoning.  Now I just pour in 2-4 tbsp, taste and add more if needed.  Hence these quantities are a bit vague.)

Once the sushi is cooked, cool to either lukewarm or room temperature.  I often spread mine on a plate and put it in the freezer.  (NOTE: the original Food and Wine recipe I used suggested it was fine to use hot rice but I like to cool it down a bit.)

While the rice cools, dry fry the sesame seeds until fragrant.  Set aside.  Heat the oil in the frypan and fry the walnuts for a few minutes until they crisp up - you can tell because they will smell wonderful.  Add the edamame, maple syrup and tamari and stir constantly until it thickens slightly.  This should only take a minute or two.  Stir in the sesame seeds and remove from the heat.  Cool slightly before using.  The mixture will harden slightly as it cools.

Take one nori sheet and lay down on a bamboo mat with the shiny side down.  Spread the rice over all of the sheet except a small line at the far edge.  I use the back of the spoon to flat against the nori as much as possible.  Scatter about half the filling in a line across the middle.  Use the bamboo mat to fold the nori and rice across the filling so that the filling ends up in the middle of the rice and roll up.  (NOTE: The original Food and Wine recipe suggests crushing a rice grain on the edge to help seal the sushi.)  Cut into smaller pieces and enjoy!

On the stereo:
Let no man steal your thyme: the Shelagh McDonald collection

22 comments:

  1. That filling looks delicious! My Sylvia loves sushi so we make it a lot t home too, would be nice to try a different filling :)

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    1. Thanks Kate - hope your sylvia loves it

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  2. Ahhh! I'm snacking on edamame right now (I'm intrigued by your "endamame" spelling. I thought it was a typo but you've spelled it that way throughout. Did you get a packet with that spelling, or something?) This is so clever, Johanna!

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    1. Thanks Hannah - sigh! I would love to claim that I use a special version or brand but the truth is that neither I nor my spellcheck are very familiar with the word - have fixed it on my post!

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    2. And I think I might have to do a find and replace search of my blog for dodgy spelling - oh dear!!!

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    3. Teehee, a part of me was hoping that it was a special kind of edamame in Australia!! And gosh, how I'd love to make a paid career out of spellchecking blogs, restaurants menus, and storefront signage...

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  3. These are a sight for jaded, sushi-loving eyes!

    Though I've always enjoyed them in restaurants, I've never bought edamame before. Where do you buy them?

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    1. Thanks Cindy - oh yes! I don't tend to find edamame in supermarkets but it is easily available in freezer section of Asian shops (Minh Phat, the shop at the train level of Melbourne Central or Yahweh Asian Grocer on the corner of Pelham and Swanston). I often buy them slightly salted in the pods which are delicious but for this recipe I used a bag of frozen edamame beans.

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    2. Thanks, I will keep an eye out for them!

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  4. What a creative take on sushi! I would love these for sure, my kind of vegetarian sushi roll.

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    1. thanks Natalie - who wouldn't love this lovely version of sushi - you really should try it!

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  5. I admire you for making your own sushi - it's something I haven't been game to try. I love how you are inventing your own flavours - the nuts would bring great texture xx

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    1. Thanks Charlie - it isn't too hard to make sushi just so long as you don't have high expectations of having them rolled really tightly. And I learnt recently from Hannah of wayfaring chocolate that there is always the Chirashizushi sushi which means just scattering the filling over the rice rather than rolling :-)

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  6. Oh Johanna, why oh why can't this be available at the shops?! Not that I mind making it myself - I will be making it myself - but I love sushi so much when it's like this and not at all when it's mayonnaise covered, paltry vegetables. Thanks for the idea of this, I have never even though of putting edamame in sushi (although I've eaten it alongside many a time).

    The thought of a library afternoon followed by this for tea also sounds like weekend bliss :-)

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    1. Thanks Kari - I hope you will love it (I suspect you will). I am surprised that you haven't had enamame in sushi because you seem to have posted a few interesting sushi recipes.

      RE you comment about if only this was available in shops, as I wrote this post, I did think that I could make my fortune by setting up a shop to sell these :-) I don't like those mayo ones either

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  7. Oh yes yes! I have to admit that I was nodding my head when you mentioned jaded sushi lovers. I think that's me! :D

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    1. Thanks Lorraine - glad to hear I am not the only jaded sushi lover

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  8. A major part of the fun of making sushi at home is definitely getting to create your own fillings! These sound awesome!

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    1. Thanks Joanne - I haven't done much experimenting with making sushi but must do more after this

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  9. This sounds like a delicious combination. I am yet to try making sushi at home.

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  10. Ooh that sushi looks grand. I love sushi, but we hardly every make it as I find it just a bit too faffy. However, next time we do I think we might be using some of your new filling - it sounds delicious.

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  11. I don't fall into the "jaded sushi lover" category (I do love that phrase) as sushi is something that has never captured the interest of my taste buds. I do love the sound of this filling, it sounds like a great recipe to try.

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